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Zoethe

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Scared [Mar. 15th, 2006|07:08 pm]
Zoethe
[Current Mood |stressedpanicky]

I have 4 books, a couple dozen articles, and several encyclopedia entries to read, all on the topic of organ donation and whether using an opt-out approach for volunteering (having to say "no, I won't" rahter than "yes, I will") is ethical and workable.

I have to digest all this and turn it into a comprehensible, footnoted, 30-35 page paper. By April 1. I've read about a dozen pages so far, out of about 750.

And my comprehension sucks. I'm exhausted, work has been an absolute bitch, and I have a splitting headache.

I honestly don't know if I have it in me. I'm really scared this time.
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Comments:
From: whoa_bitter
2006-03-16 12:21 am (UTC)
By April 1.

I double-dog dare you to hand in something and then come back saying "April Fools!"
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[User Picture]From: mycorethoughts
2006-03-16 12:25 am (UTC)
You can do this. Deep breath, take one page at a time. Don't allow those defeatist thoughts in - if you couldn't do it, you never ever would have gotten this far. *hugs*
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[User Picture]From: casu_consulto
2006-03-16 12:37 am (UTC)
That's a lot of work! But it sounds fascinating, and I think you can do it.
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[User Picture]From: smldada9801
2006-03-16 12:47 am (UTC)
What an interesting topic. Good luck with the research!
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[User Picture]From: dreagoddess
2006-03-16 01:01 am (UTC)
*hugs tightly* Everyone has to go through this. It's part of the law gauntlet. You'll make it, I know it.
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[User Picture]From: jeanniemac
2006-03-16 01:02 am (UTC)
You can do this! I know you can. You've come so far and the end is in sight. You have faced far worse thing and conquered them. I know you will succeed!
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[User Picture]From: cathawk
2006-03-16 01:02 am (UTC)
Sounds incredibly overwhelming. Enough to make you sick for quite a few days....any chance you could not go to work for a few days to ease the stress and give yourself some space to do the work without killing yourself?
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[User Picture]From: zoethe
2006-03-16 01:13 am (UTC)
Well, there's that whole deadlines issue.

You wanna know what's bad? I had a dream that my mom died, but I got up and went to work anyway because I had too much to get done.
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[User Picture]From: cieo
2006-03-16 01:03 am (UTC)
It'll get done. It's a proven fact that your pace will increase exponentially as the deadline gets closer. Best of luck.
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[User Picture]From: zoethe
2006-03-16 01:15 am (UTC)
HA! We are incredibly shorthanded right now, and I'm working on projects where I am literally the only person who knows how to do them. Everyone is fighting to stay above water.
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[User Picture]From: ba1126
2006-03-16 11:47 am (UTC)
Any chance they'd get you a temp to do the simple stuff, so that you could take an hour here or there for study/homework?
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[User Picture]From: zoethe
2006-03-16 12:21 pm (UTC)
Naw. I've survived 3.5 years of law school without anything like that, I'll make it through this. (Last night turned out to be pretty productive, so I'm not feeling quite so desperate today.)
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[User Picture]From: ba1126
2006-03-17 12:12 am (UTC)
I'm glad you're doing better today. Sometimes all we need is a good night's sleep.
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[User Picture]From: wilfulcait
2006-03-16 01:35 am (UTC)
At least in some states, the person's consent to organ donation terminates when they die (which they have to do before the donation can occur). So the actual decision goes to next of kin, who should presumably be influenced by the person's consent... but may not.

See also recent research indicating that next of kin aren't much better than random chance at figuring out what medical procedures people would want done on them when they are unable to give or withhold consent on their own. (I think next of kin got it right 68% of the time and doctors got it right 63% of the time ... something like that).

Anyway... fascinating topic, anything you write will sound wise, you're going to do a great job. Is this your third-year paper? If so, isn't it essentially pass-fail?
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[User Picture]From: zoethe
2006-03-16 01:43 am (UTC)
No, it's not my upper-division writing credit; it's for the Israel seminar. Which is good, since the prof really likes me and if I do a decent job I'm all but guaranteed an A - good for the old GPA, y'know?
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[User Picture]From: dweezel
2006-03-16 01:42 am (UTC)
Can you take vacation days from work?
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[User Picture]From: zoethe
2006-03-16 01:44 am (UTC)
I'm hoping to avoid that, but I will if I need to.
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[User Picture]From: his_angel
2006-03-16 03:13 am (UTC)
Sounds fascinating. I'm all for organ donation and any way in which to increase such. I think New Zealand is looking into doing something similiar to what you're researching about. {At least I think I recall that correctly.} Hope you can find the time to do everything you need to complete with work and school but still have some time for yourself.

angel
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[User Picture]From: celyste
2006-03-16 05:49 am (UTC)
opt-out... I like it! I'm sure it would wake a lot of people up as to the idea of signing and carrying the little card that says "DON'T DO IT!". Would probably need advertising and alerting for 6 months to a year before they could just switch over to it. Cool!
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[User Picture]From: happydog
2006-03-16 07:11 am (UTC)
OK, you can do this. I believe in your abilities.

Second: how much of the source material is repetitive, and can be safely used only as reference material/padding? When writing papers, skimming is your friend, your lovely lovely friend. I would imagine that the articles and the encyclopedia entries are very repetitive and have the same material. That might help in that you don't have to absorb ALL of it.

break it down as much as possible into sections and go at it "bird by bird" as Anne Lamott says. A few pages a night.

I know you have a headache right now, but the headache will pass. Allot time for bed, sleep, and breathing.

And if it helps you, I'm in a parallel boat: comprehensive exams, covering everything I ever studied on counseling in grad school, on Apr. 1 (hahaha) and Apr. 22. Piece by piece, I plod on.

Good luck & good energies sent to you. You can do this.
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[User Picture]From: zoethe
2006-03-16 11:31 am (UTC)
Yeah, you're right. I did get through a fair amount of reading last night, and found that I could readily skim the background stuff. Problem now is research explosion - the more I read, the more good stuff I went and found. At least I feel like I've got the resources now. Even if I do have more than 1200 pages to work through! (Skim, skim, skim!)
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[User Picture]From: bbwoof
2006-03-16 04:42 pm (UTC)
IANAL. Therefore, I can opt for the "common sense" approach to the question, rather than the legal one.

The voluntary donation of body parts after death is based on the assumption that the body parts in question belong to the person attached to them.

The assumed donation (with or without an "opt-out option") of body parts after death is based on the assumption that the body parts in question -- and presumably the body that they come from -- belong to the state. What implications can be drawn from that?

Sorry about adding to your problems...
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[User Picture]From: zoethe
2006-03-16 04:46 pm (UTC)
No, it's definitely one of the questions that needs addressing. Despite the success of the program in a number of countries, there is huge resistance, and that is one of the things that it's based on.
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[User Picture]From: beckyzoole
2006-03-16 10:17 pm (UTC)
What a fascinating line of reasoning!

When it comes down to it, so many questions revolve around that point. The military draft, imprisonment, and involuntary commitment all imply that the body belongs to the state. A person enjoys bodily freedom not as the default state, but by a default permission granted by the state.

The state may revoke that permission under certain conditions. It may need to have 12 jurors or at least one judge concur that those conditions have been met. On the other hand, in the case of the draft, it may simply decide it needs the services of the person's body.

This is very much like eminent domain, isn't it?
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[User Picture]From: beckyzoole
2006-03-16 10:19 pm (UTC)
(I meant to go on to point out that abortion laws, drug laws, and motorcycle helmet requirements all acquire tremendous justification when the default condition is that the citizen's body belongs to the state, rather than the citizen.)
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[User Picture]From: correspondguy
2006-03-16 06:58 pm (UTC)
Of course you do. You'll win through, as you always do, and leave yourself and your friends in awe at your strength and dedication.

I always have trouble with the writing, not the reading. Law writing is so different from my normal style that it takes me about two hours a page.

Look back at what you've done. If you can achieve all that you have in the last four years, you can whip out one more paper. Hell, 3L's aren't expected to be awesome, right?
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[User Picture]From: zoethe
2006-03-16 07:03 pm (UTC)
It helped to sit down and start reading. Of course it led me to an additional 700 pages of material, but I'm starting to get ideas. I'm not as panicky today.

By the end of the weekend I will be a wreak, though. Just wait.
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[User Picture]From: libco
2006-03-17 05:36 pm (UTC)
Excellent topic. I hate the idea that my loved one's could countermand my desire for organ donation though and that doesn't seem to be addressed at all.
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[User Picture]From: zoethe
2006-03-17 06:03 pm (UTC)
Actually, a lot of states have laws that say that they can't, but hospitals are really leery about pissing off the bereaved.
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[User Picture]From: libco
2006-03-17 06:31 pm (UTC)
I plan to disinherit any family member who does that - it will be in my will :)
Ha! I'm not sure what I can disinherit them of mind you.
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